Brent Birnbaum in ARTnews

Brent Birnbaum in ARTnews

HABITAT: Obsessions—Artists, Curators, and Dealors Share Their Unusual Collections

BY Maximilíano Durón and Katherine McMahon

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While this issue of ARTnews focuses on today’s prominent art collectors, the urge to amass objects—both valuable and not—is nearly as old as mankind. The ancient Greeks and Romans collected, as Erin Thompson writes in her recently published book Possession: The Curious History of Private Collectors from Antiquity to the Present, as did Dutch aristocrats of Holland’s
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Review of Brent Birnbaum exhibition by Jongho Lee for Eyes Towards the Dove

Review of Brent Birnbaum exhibition by Jongho Lee for Eyes Towards the Dove

“Voyeur Voyager Forager Forester at Denny Gallery” by Jongho Lee on August 24, 2016

Read on Eyes Towards the Dove

In Brent Birnbaum’s first solo exhibit with Denny Gallery “Voyeur Voyager Forager Forester,” he carves out a new world for audiences to explore through the use of 45 pre-owned mini-fridges (specifically ones with faux wood-panel doors). Birnbaum stacks these objects into 16 different totems, each at a height ranging between two to
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Review of Brent Birnbaum exhibition by Claire Voon for Hyperallergic

Review of Brent Birnbaum exhibition by Claire Voon for Hyperallergic

“Retro Refrigerators as Totems to Our Food Storage Habits” by Claire Voon on August 22, 2016

Read on Hyperallergic

I’d expected the exhibition of 45, wood-paneled mini-fridges at the Lower East Side’s Denny Gallery to offer a literally cool breather from this sweltering summer, but none of them were running. The gallery has opted to leave them off for the obvious environmental reasons, but it does, however, offer visitors an uncommon gesture: an invitation to touch the
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Artsy features Brent Birnbaum

Artsy features Brent Birnbaum

Why an Artist Filled a Lower East Side Gallery with Mini-Fridges

By Casey Lesser

Jul 13, 2016

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On the first day of summer, Brent Birnbaum’s small, cubicle-like studio at the Brooklyn Army Terminal is stuffed nearly to the ceiling with 45 used mini-fridges. They’re of the faux-woodgrain variety that you might find in a ’90s-era man cave, or packed with Bud Light in a college dorm room, but they’re destined for a
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